New Additions- December 2018

We’ve been quite busy over the past month and we have big news for the upcoming New Year!

First and foremost: We will be moving during the month of January to our new location–just across the street to the former location of The Woodstock Gallery and Frame Shop. We will begin moving mid-January and will be completely set up in our new location by February 1st. During January we will be open by appointment, so give us a call first.

And from now until December 24th we will be Open every day of the week for your shopping convenience. We will be closed on Christmas Day and the day after (Mike’s Birthday!).

We have a few new additions as well:

  • Wired By ALP Essential Oil Bracelets- These hand beaded bracelets have lava stones that act as a reservoir for essential oils. Simply dab your favorite oil or blend onto the lava stone and it will slowly diffuse into the air around you all day.
  • Sainte Victoire, Cotes de Provence, Rose- A light, crisp rose with lots of melon, a hint of almonds and a balanced acidity
  • Chateau Bonnet, Bourdeaux Blanc- A mellow blend of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon and Muscadelle with notes of apple, pear, tropical fruits and a very clean finish.
  • Sassafras bark- Cut and sifted- great for making root beer or a spicy tea. Product of the USA. It smells Heavenly.
  • Summer Savory- Dried, whole leaf
  • Gumbo File Powder- A blend of sassafras leaf and thyme that is an essential component of Creole Cooking
  • Culinary Sage- Dried, whole leaf and Locally Grown!
  • Makrut (Kaffir) Lime Leaves- Dried, whole–an essential herb for authentic Thai cuisine–makes an interesting ingredient in gin–goes great with green tea too.
  • Tejpatta- Indian Bay Leaf- Dried, whole leaf- essential in Indian cuisine.
  • Thai Chilies- Whole, dried–great for making red curry paste, in stirfries and giving some kick to really anything you are cooking
  • Szechuan (Sichuan) Peppercorns- An essential ingredient in Authentic Chinese Cuisine especially from Szechuan Province. These are nothing like black peppercorns. Szechuan pepper are the fruit of a tree related to oranges and lemons–they are tart and cause an interesting numbing/buzzing sensation in the mouth.
  • Stevia Herb- Powdered stevia acts as a completely natural sweetener.
  • Vegetarian Gel Capsules- size 0 empty gel capsules are great for making your own supplements.

And we also have a fresh batch of functional ceramics from local potter Barbarah Robertson, including our custom- made Woodstock, VA mugs. These large, heavy-duty (and surprisingly lightweight) coffee mugs have a bright, sky-blue glaze along the upper 2/3 portions and “WOODSTOCK, VA” embossed along the bottom. We have some of Barbarah’s fluted mugs with a honey/caramel glaze, Virginia-shaped ornaments  and several platters in different finishes.

Back in stock:

  • “Betwixt” and “Cider Maker’s Barrel” hard ciders from Old Hill Cidery
  • Bluestone Vineyard’s 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc
  • Big Hawk Premium Sake–A light, crisp Ginjo sake

New Additions- November 2018

We’ve been very busy this past month and there are lots (!) of new products gracing our shelves-

For the Pantry we now have instant Vegetarian Vegetable Soup Broth Powder, No-Beef Broth Powder, No-Chicken Broth Powder and Nutritional Yeast Powder. The “chicken” and “beef” broth powders taste and smell just like the real thing but are low in sodium, have essentially no fat and are great for making soba and other instant noodle soups on the fly. The nutritional yeast powder is actually very nutritious- high in protein and vitamins – and is made from all-natural, deactivated yeast. It smells like chicken and wild rice soup with extra mushrooms and tastes similar to miso. The yeast powder imparts a rich, meaty quality to dishes and is great for making savory broth from scratch.

And to go along with the broth powders we have Veggie Deluxe Soup Blend- a rich and flavorful blend of dehydrated vegetables and herbs that are great for making a quick stew. We also have dried Organic shiitake mushrooms and Bell peppers.

Also we now carry Organic Mushroom Gravy Mix, French Onion Dip Mix and Red Enchilada Simmer Sauce (tastes just like home made) from Simply Organic.

New: Artisan Salts from JQ Dickinson Salt Works. JQ Dickinson Salt Works makes salt from ancient brine deposits deep underneath West Virginia’s Kanawha Valley. The brine was left behind when the Iapetus Sea which covered our region 400 million years ago evaporated- so technically this is sea salt. We carry their Heirloom (plain) salt in refillable grinder jars and in bulk bags. We also have their ramp salt (lightly flavored with local ramps -a relative of onions) and Apple-Wood Smoked Salt (earthy and slightly smoky).

Back in Stock: Traditional Yellow Corn, Blue Corn and Guacamole Flavored tortilla chips from Nana’s Cocina.

On the Spice Rack we now have Organic white peppercorns, Organic dried jalapeno and Simply Organics Mulling Spice Blend- perfect for making spiced cider or mulled wine at home. Also Organic dried lemongrass (great for making tea), hibiscus and black peppercorns are back in stock. I also stashed our harvest of fresh, locally-grown lemongrass in the freezer. The frozen lemongrass works great in place of fresh in recipes like Tom Yum Goong and in curry pastes.

On the Wine Wall we now have Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from Hook or Crook. Blueberry Muffin, Blackberry Cobbler, Ras Ma Tas Apple Raspberry Wines from Peaks of Otter are back in stock as is Hugl’s Zweigelt.

And on the Beer Cart we now have “Cheeky Monkey” Belgian-Style Blonde Ale and “Cocoborealis” Triple Chocolate Stout from Chaos Mountain and Hoptimization IPA from Brothers Craft Brewing. Legend’s Brown ale is back in stock and we got a sweet close out deal on Hacker Pschorr’s Oktoberfest.

Remember the Holidays are just a few weeks away -yeah I know it’s hard to believe it’s that time of the year again. We have a ton of hand made fabric ornaments and gift tags made by Dawn Steed and lots more goodies on the way. Hopefully my latest batch of pottery will be ready to go here shortly as well. And for your four-legged friends or friends with four-legged friends we are well stocked on gourmet dog treats like Doggie Donuts and Goat Cheese Twists  from South Paws K9 Bakery-

Home Brews – Anisette

Three recipes for making anise flavored liqueurs-

Anise flavored liquors and liqueurs are popular in Europe and around the Mediterranean. Often served before or after a meal they are thought of as a digestive aid. I personally can’t vouch for that but they are tasty unless you don’t like licorice- in which case you probably won’t like these.

Anise flavored liquors (like Ouzo) and Liqueurs (like Anisette) turn cloudy when diluted with water. This is called “the Ouzo effect”. This is due to chemical compounds- mainly trans-anethole- imparted by the anise seed and star anise coming out of suspension as water dilutes the drink and lowers the alcohol content. You can see this in the two pictures below of a glass of Mastika with ice melting into it-

On that note: never store anise-flavored spirits in the fridge or freezer as this will cause a similar effect due to the drop in temperature. Once the anethole comes out of suspension it will eventually turn to sediment and will negatively effect the flavor of the brew. Honestly you shouldn’t be keeping liquors or liqueurs in the freezer anyway.

Liqueur Recipes- Simple and Easy Anisette

*This liqueur tastes remarkably complex for how few ingredients there are. The scent and flavor is very similar to Marie Brizzard Anisette. Unlike commercially produced anisette though it is a greenish-gold color -not clear- as this brew is not distilled afterwards.  It makes an interesting ingredient in cocktails and it’s wonderful on the rocks.

* For an herbaceous, green anisette that looks and tastes similar to a pastis or absinthe add a tbsp or two of mashed fresh fennel greens and fresh parsley to the brew a full 24 hours before straining.

  1. Pour the vodka into a mason jar (preferably wide mouth).
  2. Coarsely crush the spices in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder and add to the jar.
  3. Tightly seal up the jar and shake vigorously for a minute or so. Then place the jar in a cool dark location for at least 5 days (preferably a week or two), shaking daily.
  4. After the spices have infused check the brew. The liqueur should have an intense and intoxicating anise scent balanced with underlying spicy and citrusy notes. Add a tbsp of honey and let it dissolve then taste and see if it has the desired level of sweetness. If not add more honey (it should be semi-dry and very smooth). Seal the jar and shake vigorously for a minute or so. Let stew for another 8 to 12 hours, shaking every so often.
  5. Decant and strain the liqueur -preferably twice- through coffee filters or cotton plugs or both. The strained liquid should be a beautiful translucent, greenish gold. It should not be cloudy. Place liqueur in a bottle or jar (preferably dark glass) and keep tightly sealed. You can drink it straight away but I think it actually improves for weeks after straining. If kept in a tightly stoppered bottle at normal room temperature it should keep for months.

Liqueur Recipes- Complex and Spicy Anisette

*This liqueur tastes (and smells) similar to Ouzo although it is smoother, spicier and sweeter. It can be served like brandy, in cocktails that use anise based liqueurs or on the rocks. If served with ice or cool water this translucent liqueur will turn cloudy like ouzo.

  1. Pour the vodka into a mason jar (preferably wide mouth).
  2. In a mortar and pestle or spice grinder coarsely crush/grind the spices and add them to the jar.
  3. Tightly seal up the jar and shake vigorously for a minute or so. Then place the jar in a cool, dark location and let stew for week, shaking daily.
  4. Dissolve a tbsp of the honey to the jar and taste it to see if has the desired sweetness. If not add more honey. Then seal it back up. Shake the jar vigorously for a minute or so. Return the jar to a cool, dark location and let stew for a few more days to a week, shaking daily.
  5. Open the jar and smell the brew- it should smell intensely of anise with an underlying backbone of cinnamon and cloves with floral notes. Taste the liqueur again to see if it has the desired level of sweetness. It should have a little bite from the alcohol but it should not burn like moonshine. This liqueur should have a brandy-like mouth feel so if the alcohol is to strong add a little more honey. It should be semi-sweet, complex, spicy and smooth
  6. Decant and strain the liqueur -preferably twice- through coffee filters or cotton plugs or both. The strained liquid should be a beautiful, translucent earthy red- like a fine China black tea tea. It should not be cloudy. Place liqueur in a bottle or jar and keep tightly sealed. You can drink it straight away but I think it actually improves for weeks after straining. If kept in a tightly stoppered bottle at normal room temperature it should keep for months.

Liqueur Recipes- Mastika

*Mastika (or Mastica) is an anise-based liqueur flavored with gum mastic that is popular in Greece and surrounding countries. Gum mastic or mastic of Chios is a resin obtained from a tree related to pistachios native the Aegean basin. Gum mastic has a slightly bitter, piney, bay-leaf like scent and flavor. This liqueur tastes (and smells) similar to Ouzo. It can be served like Ouzo in cocktails in or on the rocks. If served with ice or cool water this translucent liqueur will turn cloudy like ouzo.

  1. Pour the vodka into a mason jar (preferably wide mouth).
  2. In a mortar and pestle crush the gum mastic and add it to the jar. Let it dissolve (this may take a few hours).
  3. In a mortar and pestle or a spice grinder coarsely crush/grind the other spices and add them to the jar.
  4. Tightly seal up the jar and shake vigorously for a minute or so. Then place the jar in a cool, dark location and let stew for week, shaking daily.
  5. Dissolve a tbsp of the honey into the brew then taste it to see if it has the desired level of sweetness. This liqueur should be semi-dry with some a bitter, piney notes imparted by the gum mastic. Seal the jar back up and shake vigorously for a minute or so. Return the jar to a cool, dark location and let stew for another day or two, shaking occasionally.
  6. Decant and strain the liqueur -preferably twice- through coffee filters or cotton plugs or both. The strained liquid should be a translucent reddish-brown – like tea. It should not be cloudy. Place liqueur in a bottle or jar and keep tightly sealed. You can drink it straight away but I think it actually improves for weeks after straining. If kept in a tightly stoppered bottle at normal room temperature it should keep for months.

Three Easy Stir Fry Recipes with Napa Cabbage

Napa or Chinese cabbage seems to be at it’s best this time of the year so here are three very quick and easy stir fry recipes that make use of it-

Spices for making Chinese five spice powder-

Napa cabbage is very different from the red and green cabbage you normally find at the grocery store. It is much more tender and mellow. It’s flavor is more like a mild celery than cabbage with nutty undertones and it doesn’t develop that sulfurous stench when cooked. It also keeps well once chopped and does not develop those black moldy looking spots as long as it is refrigerated.

*These recipes are loosely based on recipes from Elaine Luo’s cooking blog- www.chinasichuanfood.com – if you would like to find more authentic Chinese recipes check it out.

*The actual cooking process for this recipe is very quick- so it’s much easier to have everything prepped and ready to go.

*Chinese black vinegar, or chinkiang vinegar, is a dark, malty vinegar made from rice and wheat. It tastes very similar to a Flemish sour red ale without the bubbles.  If Chinese black vinegar is unavailable a mixture of regular rice vinegar and a balsamic vinegar, or Flemish sour or smoky brown ale is a pretty close substitute.

*Bok Choy can be used in place of Napa Cabbage. Whichever Chinese cabbage you are using the greens will cook much faster than the white rib portions- so to keep them from getting mushy they should be added just before removing from heat.

 

Vegetables:  Szechuan-Style Cabbage Stir fry

*Doubanjiang is a paste made from fermented fava beans (broad beans), hot chilies, salt and spices. There is really nothing quite like a quality Doubanjiang but a mixture of Sichuan Chili Oil and regular Chinese Black Bean Paste will make an effective substitute.

  • 1 tbsp each Chinese Black Vinegar, Chinese Cooking Wine and light soy sauce
  • 2 tsp each sugar (opt) and starch
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp sea salt (or to taste)
  • 3-4 green onions, sliced thin on the bias
  • 1-2 cloves garlic
  • 3-5 slices of fresh ginger
  • 1 tbsp Doubanjiang (fermented broad bean and chili paste)- pref from Pu Xian region
  • ½ tsp Chinese Five Spice powder (or to taste)
  • 1-3 dried Thai red chilies crushed in a mortar and pestle
  • Vegetable oil (pref sesame oil) as needed for coating pan
  • 1 head Napa Cabbage, sliced thin with white portions separated from the greens
  • Additional light soy sauce, ground Szechuan Pepper and thinly slices green onions to garnish

 

  1. In a small bowl mix vinegar, wine, soy sauce, sugar (if using), starch, sesame oil and sea salt. Sauce should be about the color of lightly creamed coffee. Set aside.
  2. In a second bowl crush the white portions of green onions as well as the garlic and ginger slices to a paste and mix thoroughly. Set aside.
  3. In a mortar and pestle mash up the Doubanjiang and stir in the Five Spice powder and Thai chilies. Set aside.
  4. In a wok or deep sauté or frying pan heat oil over medium. When nice and hot add the onion/garlic/ginger paste and sauté 30 sec or so until the raw garlic smell goes away. Add Doubanjiang/chili/ Five Spice mixture and sauté for another minute or until the reddish oil begins to separate from the pastes.
  5. Add the sliced up white portions of the cabbage, turn heat up to medium-high, stir for a minute and then add the sauce.  Continue cooking  for a minute or two until sauce thickens and turns translucent. Stir in green portions of cabbage and remove from heat.
  6. Serve hot with steamed rice and garnish with remaining green onion slices and a drizzle of soy sauce.

 

Pasta:  Chili Sesame Noodles

*If alkaline noodles are unavailable vermicelli or thin spaghetti will work. Tahini paste will work as sesame paste.

 

  1. Cook noodles in salted water until al dente. Drain, toss with a tsp of sesame oil (so they don’t glue themselves together) and set aside.
  2. In a small bowl stir remaining sesame oil, vinegar, soy sauces and water one by one into the sesame paste until it is thick and creamy. Add the salt and five spice powder and set aside.
  3. In a large wok, deep sauté or frying pan heat cooking and chili oils oil over medium. When nice and hot add the garlic paste and sauté 30 sec or so until the raw garlic smell goes away.
  4. Add the sliced up white portions of the cabbage, turn heat up to medium-high, stir for a minute then push the cabbage to the sides of the pan. Add the sesame sauce, cook for a minute then stir in the noodles.
  5. Mix everything together and cook for a minute or so until the noodles are nice and hot. Stir in green portions of cabbage and remove from heat.
  6. Serve hot garnished with fried soybeans or toasted peanuts, a drizzle of soy sauce and green onions.

 

Pasta:  Egg Fried Noodles In Black Bean Sauce

*Douchi are salted, fermented and spiced black soybeans. Douchi smells strangely chocolate-like with a very salty, savory flavor. There is really nothing quite like them but if you mix up some regular canned black beans with ginger, Chinese five spice powder, a lot of salt and cocoa powder it actually smells and tastes roughly similar.

*If alkaline noodles are unavailable plain ramen noodles, vermicelli or thin spaghetti will work. You can also use quinoa pasta- but you will want to rinse the noodles off after cooking as they tend to glue themselves together after draining.

  • ½ lb alkaline noodles
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil – or as needed
  • 1 tbsp Douchi (fermented and spiced black soybeans)
  • 1 tbsp each Chinese black vinegar, light soy sauce and dark soy sauce.
  • ½ tsp Chinese five spice powder (or to taste)
  • 1-2 Thai chilies, broken coarsely (opt)
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, crushed to a paste
  • 1-2 slices ginger root, mashed to a paste
  • 1 lb shiitake mushrooms, sliced thin
  • 3-5 leaves Napa Cabbage, sliced thin with white portions separated from the greens
  • ¼ tsp sea salt (or to taste)
  • Additional light soy sauce and thinly sliced green onions to garnish

 

  1. Cook noodles in salted water until al dente. Drain, toss with a tsp of sesame oil (so they don’t glue themselves together) and set aside.
  2. In a mortar and pestle mash up the douchi. Add a tsp of sesame oil, the vinegar, soy sauces and spices and mix everything together into a thin paste. Set aside.
  3. In a large wok, deep sauté or frying pan heat a tbsp of sesame oil over medium. When nice and hot pour the beaten eggs into the pan. Let them sit for a minute until they begin to set up then break them up with a spoon and fry until just cooked.
  4. Push eggs pieces to the sides of the pan and pour another tbsp or so of oil into the center of the pan. Add the garlic and ginger and sauté 30 sec or so until the raw garlic smell goes away.
  5. Add the mushrooms and white portions of the cabbage, turn heat up to medium-high, stir for a minute or so then push the cabbage to the sides of the pan.
  6. Add the black bean sauce, cook for a minute then stir in the noodles.
  7. Mix everything together and cook for a minute or so until the noodles are nice and hot. Stir in green portions of cabbage and remove from heat.
  8. Serve hot garnished with a drizzle of soy sauce and green onions.

Lots of New Stuff!

We’ve been busy restocking and finding great new products for you to try.

*Firehook Flatbread crackers are back- with a new multigrain flax flavor.  Perfect with Greenhaven Farms soft goat cheese.

*Nana’s Cocina tortilla chips are back and in smaller packages(smaller price too!)

*We now have BBQ sauce from S&D’s BBQ in Hillsboro–Sweet & Tangy and Sweet Diablo.  Dan, the “D” of S&D, used to be the Cookie Guy and the chocolate guy.  He sold his chocolate equipment to Andrea Howard (Veritas Artizen Chocolates) and we now sell her bean-to-bar chocolate confections, including new 80 and 90% bars. It’s a very small world.

*We now have sampler sizes of the gourmet oils and vinegars from Flavor Pourfection as well as a few new flavors like “Milanese Gremolata” infused olive oil

*In addition to a fresh batch of salted VA peanuts from Plantation Peanuts we now have their redskin peanuts in 22 oz. cans.

*For our VA wine lovers, we have new ladies black T-shirts with the state of Virginia on the front and the words “Wine. It puts me in a good state!”

Speaking of wine, we got a little carried away at the Kysela warehouse tasting last month.  New on the shelves:

  •      Veuve Du Vernay Sparkling Rose and Brut from France
  •      Prime Brume Soave and Cortenova Pinot Grigio from Italy
  •      Layer Cake Rose from CA
  •      Thorn Clarke Milton Park Shiraz from Australia
  •      San Elias, Siegal Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc from Chile
  •      Reibeek Pinotage from South Africa
  •      Burgo Viejo Rioja Old Vine Garnacha from Spain

*Cave Ridge’s Riesling, Red Silk, Mt. Jackson Rouge and Rose are also back, along with the last of their 2013 Syrah!

*New beers have also been added–Cael & Crede Irish Ale (barrel aged in Irish Whiskey casks); The Duck-Rabbit Wee Heavy Scotch Ale; Campion Killer Kolsch and Hog Waller Scramble (Breakfast Stout brewed with coffee and chocolate). Beer for breakfast? Yes, please!

And stay tuned–BIG news coming soon!

 

Finally framed

My first batch of winter landscape studies are finally framed and up on the walls-

“Winter Forest Late Afternoon”- Original painting by MJ Seal. Acrylic on board, 8″ x 10″. C. 2018-

 

 

For this piece I went with a distressed, dark pine frame I made from raw boards. The texture I gouged into the edges of the moulding compliment the expressive brushstrokes and texture in the paint surface.

“Snowbound Forest at Sunset- 1/15/18″- Original painting by MJ Seal. Acrylic on board, 13 1/2″ x 10 1/4”. C. 2018

For this painting I went with a walnut frame that I parcel gilt with composition leaf on the front surface. The bright gilt surface of the frame really makes the golden hues pop in this piece.

A clean, elegant walnut frame joined with keys and parcel gilt with composition leaf.

“Winter Forest at Morning- 1/15/18″- Original painting by MJ Seal. Acrylic on board, 8″ x 10”. C. 2018

 

The warm metallic gray of the silver leaf in this frame warms up the highlights in the painting and helps to tone down the blues of the shadow areas.

 

The rich dark brown of this frame helps to warm up this piece and compliment the purplish gray ground. The texture of the olivewood veneer blends in nicely with painterly tree trunks. This is the only frame in this bunch that I did not make myself.

“Winter Forest in a Snowstorm- 1/15/18″- Original painting by MJ Seal. Acrylic on board. 14″ x 10 1/4”. C. 2018

 

“Snowbound Forest- 1/16/18″- Original painting by MJ Seal. Acrylic on board, 10″ x 14 3/4”. C. 2018

 

For this piece I went with a simple, “bump” profile moulding. The grain of the oak plays off the movement of the snow covered trees and winding grape vines. The rich, golden color of the finish cools down up the warm gray hues in the painting.

 

“Snowy Winter Forest- 1/19/18″- Original painting by MJ Seal. Acrylic on board, 7″ x 10”. C. 2018

For the last two paintings I went with a very clean museum profile that was painted black and gilt on the top surface with aluminum leaf. The cool silver tones of the aluminum leaf make the cool whites of the painting seem warm by comparison. The depth of the moulding and the contrast between the flat black of the sides of the frame and the gilt front surface really makes these pieces pop off the wall.

 

“Snowy Winter Forest- 1/16/18″- Original painting by MJ Seal. Acrylic on board, 10″ x 7”. C. 2018